Fun with Filters: G’MIC for GIMP (Part 4)

GMIC Filters Part 4And so to Part 4, where we’ll take a look at the remaining filters in the Artistic category of the G’MIC menu. To learn what G’MIC is and how you can use it for free (entirely above-board and for any purpose) see part 1 of Fun with Filters: G’MIC. As I’ve mentioned elsewhere, you don’t actually need to use GIMP to be able to access all the wonderful tools of G’MIC. However, GIMP is also freely available and I find the GIMP plug-in a convenient way to access G’MIC since I generally have GIMP open regardless.

A quick recap: we’ve been looking at some of the most colourful and creative effects in the G’MIC filter arsenal. In Part 1 we previewed Anguish, Aurora, Black Crayon Grafitti, Blockism, Bokeh, and Cartoon. In Part 2 you’ll find examples of Chalk it up, Circle Abstraction, Coloured Engraving, Coloured Pencils, Colour Abstraction Paint, Cubism, Cut Out, Dream Smoothing, and Ellipsionism. Part 3 took us on a tour of Felt Pen, Finger Painting, Fractalize, Granular Texture, Graphic Boost, Graphic Novel, Hope Poster, Kuwahara, Lylejk’s Painting, Make Squiggly, and Morphology Painting.

If any of these are missing and you have G’MIC installed, you need to update your version. I did so recently and it was quick and easy.

OK, let’s race through those remaining filters and see what we effects we can achieve with Painting through to Whirl Drawing.

Painting
This gets more detailed as you dial Detail Scale down, rather than up. I gave the colour a boost with the Color slider in the right-hand image.

Painting

Painting

Painting (Close)

Painting (Close)


Paint Daub
Low iterations and amplitude on the left, default settings on the right.

Paint Daub

Paint Daub

Paint Daub (Close)

Paint Daub (Close)


Pen Drawing
High amplitude on the left, default settings on the right.

Pen Drawing

Pen Drawing

Pen Drawing (Close)

Pen Drawing (Close)


Photoillustration
Not what I expected from the name, it gives a nice retro game sprite look to small images like those here. The one on the left has several sliders set to max, the one on the right shows the default results.

Photoillustration

Photoillustration

Photoillustration (Close)

Photoillustration (Close)


Polygonize (delaunay)
Turn that density up if working with a small image, otherwise you’ll get a highly abstract result that doesn’t look like anything much. Get a psychedelic result by choosing Flat Random Colors for the background, or create a cracked look with Original Image (seen in the right-hand example).

Polygonize - Delaunay

Polygonize – Delaunay

Polygonize - Delaunay (Close)

Polygonize – Delaunay (Close)


Polygonize (energy)
Difficult to work with to create any kind of pleasing effect on a tiny image, but most postwork will be done on larger renders than those you see here. However, turn everything to low levels and you get this cross-stitch pattern effect (left). Crank up Smoothness for an alternative look (right).

Polygonize - Energy

Polygonize – Energy

Polygonize - Energy (Close)

Polygonize – Energy (Close)


Posterized Dithering
Seen at default settings here on the left, and with some alterations on the right.

Posterized Dithering

Posterized Dithering

Posterized Dithering (Close)

Posterized Dithering (Close)


Poster Edges
Sorry Poster Edges, I completely failed to do you justice. I couldn’t get any results I liked, but for the sake of completeness here’s the results. Maybe this is another that works great on big images and not on small ones. The image on the right uses maximum posterization.

Poster Edges

Poster Edges

Poster Edges (Close)

Poster Edges (Close)


Rodilius
Ah, sparkly, shiny Rodilius. It has lots of options but it’s easy to get that popular effect with just a click or two. Two variations here, with the one on the right using default settings.

Rodilius

Rodilius

Rodilius (Close)

Rodilius (Close)


Shapeism
A couple of examples of different shapes in action. This filter doesn’t give you a preiew, but you can see here what it does. There are various shapes to choose from, including stars and octagons. Here we have circles on the left and squares on the right.

Shapeism - Circles

Shapeism – Circles

Shapeism (Squares)

Shapeism (Squares)


Warhol
Get that Warhol look. The colours generated are seemingly random so won’t be the same as those you see in the preview. If you don’t like the combo, undo and run it again. You can choose how many tiles it creates.

Warhol 2x2

Warhol 2×2

Warhol 3x3

Warhol 3×3


Watercolour
Exciting name, but in my hands less than stellar results. I dislike the default output so did my best to adjust the settings, but feel like I’m missing something. I should work through the tutorial linked to from this filter sometime.

Watercolour

Watercolour

Watercolour (Close)

Watercolour (Close)


Whirl Drawing
Whirl Drawing has a certain charm, but do bear in mind it is semi-transparent. The one on the left has default settings and is layered over black, the one on the right has a higher amplitude setting and is over white.

Whirl Drawing

Whirl Drawing

Whirl Drawing (Close)

Whirl Drawing (Close)


For now these filters and those in the earlier posts represent the whole 39 in the Artistic subset. However, this category had grown a fair bit since I initially installed G’MIC so do look out for more filters in future updates.


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About Indigo

As a digital artist on a budget, I'm fascinated by what happens when art and technology meet, and love discovering affordable ways to make that happen.
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